4 Summer Dangers For Your Canine Companion

Summer is coming and with it comes the long days, luxurious walks with your canine and the sun often longed for in colder months. But, summer is not all fun and games for your pet dog if the right precautions are not taken.

Dehydration and heat exhaustion are dangers and preventions that we have considered before for dogs in the summer months, but they are not the only dangers that the warmer weather delivers for our furry friends. Here is a list of the top things to be aware of as a dog owner this summer.

Poisonous Foods 

First time dog owners, and even some experienced dog owners, might not be aware of the multitudes of foods that can be harmful for your dog. As barbecue season approaches it is important to know what you can and cannot allow your dog to eat. Here is a comprehensive, but in no way exhaustive, list:

  • Avocados
  • Onions
  • Beer
  • Coffee and tea
  • Grapes
  • Chocolate
  • Animal bones (especially chicken)
  • Eggs
  • Raw meat and fish
  • Anything with high salt content

Buzzzzzzz

Bee stings can be unpleasant for both us and our pets. The buzzing of bees might be a signal of summer for you, but it can cause your dog to investigate and result in a stung pooch. Often, there is nothing you can do in the case of a bee sting. However, excessive swelling can lead to a visit to the vets and some over the counter drugs to deal with the problem.

Dogs may also scratch swollen areas and so this should be monitored closely after a bee sting.

Tick Tick Tock 

Fleas are a pest we’ve all had to deal with at one point or another, but there is a potentially deadly critter than can get overly attached to your pet: the tick. You, or your dog walker, should check your dog daily after walks for ticks.

If you do find a tick then remove it, tweezers are often most effective in this, and place it in an airtight container if possible. Take it in to your vet for testing as ticks can carry multiple diseases such as Lyme disease. Symptoms are hard to spot, but dogs can become feverish and lame, you should talk to your vet about effective tick treatment if your dog is affected.

Grooming

 

Extra fur can be a real pest during the hotter weather. So, grooming will be especially important in the coming months as the extra fur can weigh down your pet and contribute to overheating.

Excessive panting and other signs of overheating could be a sign that it’s time to take your little friend to a groomer to professionally deal with the excess. But, it’s also important to not shave their hair too close to the skin as they also need protection from the sun.

Hopefully this blog helps to keep your dog happy and healthy this summer! If you know the dangers that the hotter months can bring, other than that pesky heat, you can then prevent your dog from having any unfortunate trips to the vet this season. Instead you can both enjoy the sunny days whilst you can and get out on those lazy afternoon walks with peace of mind!

Sometimes a helping hand is needed for your canine companion to reach their full potential, which is where we can help! If you are looking for a reliable and experienced dog trainer, as well as a dog walker, then do not hesitate to contact us. Give us a call on 07734447812 and our friendly team will be more than happy to help you with your enquiries today.

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